STEM as a Sandwich? Might be good!

Technology, as a whole, is an important part of the STEM curriculum in that it shares some “habits of mind”, as compared to the language, arts, and social science subject areas. While science utilizes the scientific method to understand principles of matter and energy in our world, we find that mathematics allows us to quantify those principles and make predictions by utilizing rigorous proofs, and engineering gives us a “built world” that gives us utility, survivability, and (hopefully) sustainability as a global society. Technology’s role is for the use, operation, and maintenance of that built world. Principles, proofs, and designs have no value to us unless they are put into action in our lives and communities. And we need technical people to keep that clockwork machinery running.

 

So what Technology brings to the STEM curriculum, I think, is that every high school graduate needs: to know how to put those “Owner’s Manuals” to use for all those gadgets they have; an awareness of the ‘”theory of operation” of how those devices work; recognition of dangerous situations and safety precautions; and some sense of a troubleshooting process when things aren’t working right. These skills and practices are exactly those critical-thinking and problem-solving techniques that are supposed to be part of an overall high school curriculum.

 

Yet these “modes of thought” should not get too tangled up in specific products or occupational fields. In my suggestions for a “Comprehensive STEM Curriculum Framework for the 21st Century”, those options would be provided in the third dimension of “Applied Career Preparation Pathways”, such as: Agriculture, Business, Communications, Construction, Health, Information Technology, Marketing, Manufacturing, and Transportation, among others.

 

So once learners develop “Core Content Competencies” of the STEM topics, to the step of a “Basic Workplace Skill Set” needed for entry into a desired occupational level, they can explore the career pathways of their choice as applications of where their “S, E, and M” knowledge is put to use. This would also be most appropriate for longer term projects, small-group interactions, and so forth. The technology aspects of the STEM curriculum, then, would be “capstones” to the essentials of the traditional courses, and infused throughout the programs, rather than distinct courses in themselves.

 

Likewise, the techniques of “information” would be tapped into where appropriate, including those involving Systems, Quality, Modeling, Informatics, and Complexity (SQMIC). We can integrate the traditional STEM subjects by building on a substrate of these “Big I = Information” tools, while overlaying them with options leading to applications in various career pathways. High school graduates would be much better prepared for life and work, I believe, with such an integrated “sandwich” curriculum, than the “silo” or “stovepipe” traditional structure in common use.

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