Flying John Boyds “OODA Loop” through STEM

John Boyd’s contribution to systems thinking was the “OODA Loop” – Observe, Orient, Decide, Act – with a feedback loop that brings the results back into a new cycle. As a combat fighter pilot instructor, he was known as “40 second Boyd” because he shot down every bogey within forty seconds of contact.

 

His key contribution was in the “Orient” thought process, in which the agent filters through “culture, genetics, ability to analyze and synthesize, and previous experience”, with a “faster tempo” than the adversary, who does not have enough time to “generate mental images”, with the effect of making the situation unpredictable. The most well-known strategic application of the OODA Loop, of course, was the Gulf War, in which the first strikes into Iraq disrupted Sadam’s communications networks, thus slowing his awareness of the actual situations.

 

A good description of the OODA Loop and its applications to military, business, and other aspects of systems thinking is provided on Wikipedia, as a first link to other reference information.

 

While it appears that many commentors to this thread express concerns about getting the whole “system of education” correct before we begin to take action, I prefer to utilize the OODA Loop, with incremental and iterative repetitions of trying new methods and evaluating the results, and then go around again, in developing an effective teaching/ learning system and process.

 

My descriptions of a “Comprehensive STEM Curriculum Framework for the 21st Century”, as described previously in this topic thread, identify every high school STEM topic with a three-dimensional coordinate of instructional modules and lessons in an “InfoSpace”, much like the Nevada skies Boyd flew in.

 

Those modules utilize the “Information Mapping” techniques of Robert E. Horn, in which the learning activities are developed using templates according to the type of instruction, such as: Fact, Concept, Structure, Procedure, Principle, Process, and System. Hyperlinks then connect the content modules to others, allowing alternative pathways through the InfoSpace, with waypoints identified for required graduation competencies. Each lesson, module, unit, and course has review and assessment components that give immediate feedback to the learner, and also provides documentation for the student, teacher, and administrators. This empowers learners to employ their own OODA Loops as they proceed through the highways and byways of the InfoSpace.

 

This overall plan, then, prepares the whole of STEM content in a way that allows flexible exploration, in groups or individually, using effective teaching/ learning practices, with immediate feedback to all stakeholders. I think that it is a “good enough” attempt to add to the discussion about transforming education. So while some may say that such a process may appear to be “designing and building the aircraft while flying it”, I don’t mind, since at least I’m flying – in the Boydian Way.

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