Blame Teachers for Common Core?

Having participated with South Dakota science and math groups, from the first NSF-SSI (Statewide Systemic Initiative) in 1991, to 2009 when we handed off our final report (which merged into CCSS), we were all proud at the work we had done over the decades.

 

We had intense debates at summer workshops about better (not perfect) ways to develop and implement the standards (many of which are currently being regurgitated in the media). We took activities, projects, and new techniques back to our classrooms to see what would work for our students. We worked in collaboration with curriculum specialists, administrators, school boards, and concerned parents who visited our schools and classrooms. We battled legislators who had partisan agendas, and lobbying organizations that promoted special interests.

 

So the handoff to Common Core was an acknowledgement of the Pareto Principle – that it was 80% “good enough” to implement statewide and to scale nationally. Further tweaking would be part of the roll-out.

 

Our pride was in the accomplishment that we now had a comprehensive, integrated, and coordinated specification of what ALL American students should know for college and for career when they graduated from high school. We were finally able to address the concerns brought forth by the 1983 “Nation at Risk” report. We had a document that we could point to and say “This is what we should do”.

 

Yet, as expressed very well in the article, all hell broke loose after that.

 

As mentioned, there has not been much discussion about the PRODUCT – the standards themselves – other than the old claims about not being “rigorous” enough for SOME learners going on to professional careers. The alternative to the CCSS standards are NO standards – the failed status quo.

 

Intense heat, though, has developed around the implementation PROCESS, which, in fact, has been part of the existing school curricula, structure, and environment all along. In that respect, your article title is correct that the CCSS is not to blame.

 

So the first step is to quit the shouting – we know what the positions are, and who is promoting what. Teachers themselves need to recognize that while they are at the center focus of change, they do not need to provide answers about what that change should be.

 

The dialog should begin with school boards, community leaders, and concerned parents with scheduled opportunities for all to participate. Since they are also the ones who will be making decisions concerning selection of textbooks and materials, funding, staffing, etc., this would be part of an information gathering process that should have been occurring throughout the previous decades.

 

So don’t blame the CCSS standards, or the teachers – they are doing their part. Now begin the community conversations about improving our education SYSTEM – one school at a time.

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